driver

Python SQL Server driver on Linux

So you have packaged your SQL monitoring and maintenance routines into a web server and demonstrated it all works from your computer. Impressed they ask for it to be put on a proper server – a Linux box. 5 years ago this would have involved using unsupported 3rd party drivers and who ran internal Linux servers anyway. Now the request seems almost reasonable although you will have to jump through more hoops than you would with Windows.

First off I’ll assume you are using the pyodbc module. On Linux this will require a C compiler. If you have chosen a minimal install then you’ll need to install them. This can be done with the following command (depending upon the flavour)

Redhat (Centos/Fedora)
sudo yum groupinstall 'Development Tools' -y
sudo yum install python-devel unixODBC-devel -y

Debian (Ubuntu)
sudo apt-get install build-essential -y
sudo apt-get install python-dev unixodbc-dev -y

With this done you can now pip install pyodbc. The pyodbc module is a wrapper around the native system drivers so you will need to install a suitable unixodbc driver. Microsoft have produced an official unixODBC driver since 2012 and it has been regularly maintained since. Installation instructions for v13 can be found on this blog post.

With pyodbc and unixodbc set up all you need to change in your actual code is the driver on the ODBC connection string to ‘ODBC Driver 13 for SQL Server’ and away you go. As a quick test, the following example will establish a connection and return the servername through a SQL query.

import pyodbc
cnxnstr = "Driver=ODBC Driver 13 for SQL Server;Server=<yourserver>;Uid=<yourusername>;Pwd=<yourpassword>;database=<yourdatabase>"
cnxn = pyodbc.connect(cnxnstr)
cursor = cnxn.cursor()
cursor.execute("SELECT @@SERVERNAME")
result = cursor.fetchall()
for row in result:
    print(row)
cursor.close()
cnxn.close()